28 September 2007

F'in Dash

There are several different bus lines that I take to and from USC in any given week. The easiest, and the cheapest, is the DASH bus service, which runs 6:30 am to 6:30 pm M-F and 10-5 on weekends. The DASH is only $.25, and while this is great, I wonder if this is another example of "you get what you pay for". I think this sign, which I found taped to the official bus sign today, says it all...

3 comments:

myriam said...

wow, whoever made that sign is fantastic! It's clear, compelling, and the design enhances the message. Fantastic! What a great thing to see in the city!

There are a lot of public-transit complainers in Chicago and not a lot of realistic comment about service, or realistic advice on how to effect change or make it better.

On the other hand, I can't think of a single bus route that is consistently that bad. But the buses aren't subcontracted here. Out of curiousity, do you know if *all* the LA buses are subcontracted?

emKem said...

Yeah, if I had to venture a guess I would say someone in the School of Architecture created and posted this sign, because the bus stop is right outside our building. Ah architects, and our consistent presentation skills....

I have no idea about the subcontracting thing. I didn't even know the DASH line was subcontracted until I read this sign! So I am curious about it myself.

myriam said...

Interesting. Part of the reason my mother is a socialist is that she believes that the more you split up the pie, the more you introduce degradation of product. (This is why she hates the federalism of the United States--the more you cut the country up into states, then counties, then cities, the more points you introduce middlemen who tend to degrade product while raising price. I'm simplifying the argument, but you get the idea.) The subcontractor thing has always been a very prescient example of this to me, as I'm sure it is to anyone who's had to do CA. The use of a subcontractor more often than not allows quality control to slip while introducing a scape-goat to allow those in charge to simply point fingers while doing nothing to address the situation.

I guess the flip side is the argument for specialisation and master-craftsmanship? 'Leave the work to the experts'?

Sorry, just some rambling thoughts.